Historic Buildings
  • Grafarkirkja

Church at Gröf

Grafarkirkja is a small chapel built by Gísli Þorláksson, bishop of Hólar in the late 17th century. The church is believed to be the work of a well-known wood carver of the time, Guðmundur Guðmundsson, whose baroque carvings can be seen on the altar and verge boards.

The Church is closed to visitors.  

Grafarkirkja is a small chapel built by Gísli Þorláksson, bishop of Hólar in the late 17th century. The church is believed to be the work of a well-known wood carver of the time, Guðmundur Guðmundsson, whose baroque carvings can be seen on the altar and verge boards. The church was deconsecrated in 1765. The National Museum of Iceland had it entirely rebuilt in its original form in 1953. The graveyard is circular, an ancient form. The farm buildings at Gröf formerly stood on a hill north of the church. The church was built in 1884, and was the last turf church built in the old style. It is one of six churches still standing, which are preserved as historical monuments. The church is maintained by the National Museum but also serves as a parish church. The church was built by the carpenter Páll Pálsson. The lock and hinges of the church door were made by Þorsteinn Gissurarson, called „tool”, who was a well-known blacksmith. The water tub he used to cool hot iron can be seen south of the churchyard.