Family Room - Borðhald / At the Table

Alla tíð hefur fólk þurft að nærast og margir gripir í Þjóðminjasafninu tengjast mat og matseld. Í Stofu er lagt á borð fyrir fjölda manns allt frá fyrstu öldum Íslandsbyggðar og fram til dagsins í dag. Matur er mannsins megin - verði ykkur að góðu! / People always need to eat and drink, and many objects in the National Museum collection relate to food and cooking. In the Famiy Room a table is laid for a large number of diners, from the early years of Icelandic history until the present day. Bon Appétit!

  • 1966-187-624 Pottbrot / Potsherd(900-1100)

    Fragment of a soapstone pot unearthed at Hvítárholt, south Iceland, in 1966. The pot has burst or broken and been mended by bracing, a common repair technique in the past. This pot may be one of the oldest examples of the method in Iceland.

  • 1975-615-47 Leirbrot / Pottery fragments(1400 - 1500)

    Fragments of the brim of a jug or dish of Siegburg stoneware, 15th century. Unglazed, with no visible ornament. The fragments were found on the site of a church at Kúabót, south Iceland, in 1975.

  • 1975-615-55 Diskur / Dish, brim fragment(1400-1500)

    Fragments of the brim of a jug or dish of Siegburg stoneware, 15th century. Unglazed, with no visible ornament. The fragments were found on the site of a church at Kúabót, south Iceland, in 1975.

  • 1978-139-30 Eldsláttusteinn / Jasper flintstone (900)

    Jasper flintstone. Probably used as a flintstone, struck against iron or steel to make a spark to light a fire. Flintstones have been found adjacent to hearths on many sites dating from the beginning of Icelandic history to the 17th century. The mineral jasper is commonly found in Iceland.

  • 1980-121-781 Trédiskur / Wooden dish(1300-1400)

    Turned wooden dish unearthed at Stóra-Borg, south Iceland. Probably of medieval date. Wooden dishes were common in Iceland and pottery was a rarity until the 18th century.

  • 1982-85 Skaftpottur / Saucepan(900-1100)

    Whole soapstone pot with handle. The soapstone fragments may have been from such a pot. The object, which has been in the National Museum since 1982, is from Auðkúla in the West Fjords. It probably dates from 900-1100.

  • 1989-137-289 Leirkrús / Pottery tankard (1550-1600)

    16th-century drinking vessel, tin-glazed, with white glaze on the interior. Ornamented in blue and turquoise, and painted with ochre decoration.

  • 1999-27-16 Pottbrot / Postherd(900)

    Fragment of a soapstone pot unearthed at Hólmur, Nes, southeast Iceland. The site dates from 870-1000 AD. Soapstone does not occur in Iceland. It was imported from Norway, which had a flourishing soapstone industry in the Viking Age.

  • 2001-21-111 Pottbrot / Potsherd(900-1100)

    Fragment of a soapstone pot unearthed in archaeological excavations 1972-78 in Herjólfsdalur, Westman Islands, off the south coast of Iceland. Such soapstone cooking vessels were common in the Viking Age in the north Atlantic region.

  • 1959-39-5 Diskur / Dish(1500-1600)

    Arnarhólstraðir Reykjavík. Dish in 12 fragments, unearthed in excavation at Arnarhóll in Reykjavík, 1959. Red clay slipware, 16th-17th century. Clear glaze on the exterior, painted ornament in moss green on the interior.

  • 1993-62-1 Diskur / Dish(1659)

    Tin-glazed pottery dish, 17th century. The dish is of Dutch majolica, tin-glazed on the interior and lead-glazed on the exterior. The original diameter of the dish was about 27.8 cm. The clay is fine and soft. Blue ornament has been painted on with a thick brush.

  • 2000-42-1 Pottur / Pot(1600-1700)

    Three-legged red clay pot, found in fragments in excavation at Nes, Seltjörn, southwest Iceland, in 2001. Probably 17th century. The fragments have been reassembled.

  • 10960 Drykkjarhorn / Drinking horn(1700-1800)

    Drinking horn of Icelandic bull horn, brass-bound and carved with interlace pattern of flowers and tendrils. In the middle of the horn is a band of brass, with a bird on the front. The band has the inscription SNÆ|BIØRN PALS|SON|am (Snæbjörn Pálsson owns me). Legs extend from the bird as a stand for the horn, and at the narrow end is a flat surface so that the horn can stand upright.

  • 1692 Tindiskur / Pewter dish(1739)

    Shallow pewter dish stamped with date 1739. Pewter tableware was used on special occasions in more prosperous homes.

  • 1732 Tinkanna / Pewter tankard(1815)

    Pewter tankard with hinged lid. On the lid is a roundel with three relief busts surrounded by a wreath. The subjects of the portraits were identified by name, but are now worn off. The National Museum collection includes very similar tankards with images of the Emperor Franz II of Austria, Tsar Alexander I of Russia, and Kaiser Wilhelm IV of Prussia, the founders of the “Holy Alliance,” formed in 1815 after the Napoleonic wars. Such tankards probably date from that time.

  • 2007-61-53 Leirpottur / Clay pot(1500-1600)

    Three-legged red clay pot unearthed at Meðalheimur in Skagafjörður, north Iceland, in 2007. Probably 16th or 17th century. The pot is small, and it lacks the handle which would make it possible to determine the date.

  • 2066 Tinfat / Pewter dish(1795)

    Oval pewter dish. The bottom is flat. On the bottom is a maker’s mark with the coat of arms of Copenhagen and atop it a crown, and below the name of the maker, T. DAHLGREN, and the date 1795. The dish is heavy, weighting more than four kilos.

  • 3236 Hnífapör / Cutlery(1696)

    Cutlery, property of regional governor Stefán Þórarinsson, who used it on his official travels. The cutlery is in a travelling

  • 3268 Tinskál / Pewter bowl

    Pewter lidded bowl or tureen. Pewter tableware was used on special occasions in more prosperous homes.

  • 10617 Vasahnífur / Penknife(1900)

    Folding penknife (pocket knife). Nickel-silver hilt with bone inlays, brass liners and nails, steel blade and spring. The knife was imported, purchased in the Jes Zimsen store in Reykjavík for 2.25 krónur. The owner carried it in his waistcoat pocket for 10 years, and often used it at meals if table knives proved inadequate. Penknives were useful for many tasks, indoors and out.

  • 10682 Askur / Wooden eating bowl

    Askur or lidded wooden eating bowl of common 18th- and 19th-century type. Each member of the household had their own askur, from which they ate sitting on their beds. The askur is unique to Iceland. They probably developed in response to the limited space in Icelandic homes.

  • 10701 Askur / Wooden eating bowl(1700-1800)

    Askur or lidded wooden eating bowl of common 18th- and 19th-century type. Each member of the household had their own askur, from which they ate sitting on their beds. The askur is unique to Iceland. They probably developed in response to the limited space in Icelandic homes.

  • 14087 Trog / Trug

    Small, well-made trug, fixed together with treenails. Trugs were used for skimming cream from milk, and also as serving dishes for food.

  • 2429 Matarhnífur og Matarkvísl / Table knife and fork(1750-1800)

    Table knife. Handle of reindeer horn with brass trim. Possibly made in Iceland. Accompanied by matching two-pronged fork. Two-pronged fork, possibly made in Iceland. Accompanied by matching knife.

  • 3149 Blöndukanna / Jug

    Jug made of staves of pine and spruce, to hold a mixture of whey and water. The jug is very small – the smallest in the Museum’s collection, with a single handle. The lid is like the lid of an askur (eating bowl), with carved foliage motif. Such jugs could be of various sizes. They stood in every home, or even in the doorway, offering a cool drink for all comers.

  • 3161 Spónn / Horn spoon(1700-1750)

    Spoon of bull’s horn with circular bowl and flat handle. On the upper surface the word gud velkom(n)er (Be heartily welcome) are carved in head-letters. On the reverse of the bowl a rosette is engraved, a rarity on horn spoons. The inside of the bowl was ornamented with a cross within a circle. Probably early 18th century. Horn spoons were used for eating from the askur (eating-bowl).

  • 7806 Spónn / Horn spoon(1873)

    Horn spoon with yellowish-brown and clear handle, and white bowl. Excellent craftsmanship and fine shading. The handle is partly carved in openwork, with the initials GBM and the date 1873. Apparently unused. Horn spoons were used for eating from the askur (eating-bowl).

  • A-6269 Askur / Wooden eating bowl

    Askur, lidded wooden eating bowl, of common 18th- and 19th-century type. Each member of the household had their own askur, from which they ate sitting on their beds. The askur is unique to Iceland. They probably developed in response to the limited space in Icelandic homes.

  • A-6355 Brennivínslegill / Liquor cask

    Such casks were used for liquor and other drinks, e.g. whey.

  • 1966-44 Gafall / Fork(1864)

    Fork made in 1864 by Ásbjörn Jacobsen, an Icelandic silversmith who spent all his career in Copenhagen. On the front of the handle is an image of a horse and a tree. On the reverse are maker’s marks and a bust on a pedestal.

  • 1974-156 Vasahnífur / Penknife

    Copper penknife with bone inlays. The iron blade does not fold into the handle as usual for penknives, but is released from the handle by a spring.

  • 1976-551-145 Krítarpípa / Clay pipe(1600-1700)

    Clay pipe: bowl and stem. The edge of the bowl is smooth, about 2.1 cm in diameter. Soot is visible on the edge of the bowl. The heel is flat, with no visible stamp or mark. The stem is straight and tapering. The mouthpiece is missing. Unearthed on the site of the Kópavogur assembly, 1976

  • 8809 Tóbaksbaukur / Snuffbox

    Snuffbox, recent and in good condition. It was common to take a little snuff after a meal.

  • Víd 137 Tóbaksponta / Snuffbox

    Snuffbox in the form of a barrel, made of walnut, silver-bound. The stopper, with engraved ornament, is attached by a chain. Around the outside of the snuffbox is a silver band with foliage pattern, and at the lower end is a cap with foliage pattern. The base is circular, engraved with the initials MM. The snuffbox has split and been braced together. It was common to take a little snuff after a meal.

  • 1966-45 Hnífur / Knife(1850)

    Knife from a set owned by Grímur Thomsen Einarsson of Borg (1891-1956), and before him poet Grímur Thomsen (1820-96) of Bessastaðir.

  • 1976-136 Diskur / Dish(1855)

    White pottery dish with painted floral motifs and other decoration. The dish was purchased from a “speculator‘s ship“ in Tálknafjörður, West Fjords, in 1855. “Speculators” were merchants who sailed from port to port selling and buying after Free Trade was granted in 1855.

  • 1994-267 Hnífur / Knife(1900-1950)

    Steel knife with inlaid handle. British make. On the blade is an indistinct mark: cast steel and SHEFFIELD.

  • 1996-267 Gaffall /Fork(1904-1918)

    Fork of conventional design. Foreign factory marks 40 and ARG4ROM. At the bottom of the handle is a falcon, an old emblem of the Icelandic state. Part of a set of tableware from the former Minister’s Residence, acquired 1904-1918.

  • 2011-99 Diskur(1874-1909)

    German dinner service, Villeroy & Boch, Julia pattern. Probably from about 1900. On the bottom of the pieces is the mark used by the company 1874-1909. The service was owned by sheriff and postmaster Sigurður Eggertsson Briem and his wife Guðrún Ísleifsdóttir Briem.

  • 2011-99 Fat(1874-1909)

    German dinner service, Villeroy & Boch, Julia pattern. Probably from about 1900. On the bottom of the pieces is the mark used by the company 1874-1909. The service was owned by sheriff and postmaster Sigurður Eggertsson Briem and his wife Guðrún Ísleifsdóttir Briem.

  • 2011-99 Tarína(1874-1909)

    German dinner service, Villeroy & Boch, Julia pattern. Probably from about 1900. On the bottom of the pieces is the mark used by the company 1874-1909. The service was owned by sheriff and postmaster Sigurður Eggertsson Briem and his wife Guðrún Ísleifsdóttir Briem.

  • ÁW Hnífapör / Cutlery

    Silver-plated cutlery with handles of bone or mother-of-pearl. The knife blade and the fork have an engraved design.

  • 2019-53-6 Glas / Glass(1954)

    Drinking glass, Duralex Picardie. Duralex glasses .

  • Á 7883 Diskur / Plate(1944-1953)

    Plate with floral pattern Morning Glory. Produced by US manufacturer Paden City Pottery which operated 1914-53, a pioneer of heat-resistant pottery.

  • A-7600 Öskubakki / Ashtray

    Glass ashtray.

  • 2019-53-3 Freyðivínsglas / Champagne glass

    Stemmed glass with printed inscription Millennium 2000.

  • 2019-53-4 Matardiskur /Dinner plate(2000)

    Dinner plate, Villeroy & Boch.

  • 2019-53-5 Hnífapör / Cutlery(1970)

    Steel knife and fork.

  • 2019-53-6 Diskur / Plate(1970)

    Glass plate, Duralex Amber.

  • 2019-53-6 Glas / Glass(1970)

    Drinking glass, Duralex Amber.

  • A-7601 Öskubakki / Ashtray(1924-1937)

    Ashtray with printed image of Einar Jónsson‘s sculpture of Iceland‘s first settler, Ingólfur Arnarson, on Arnarhóll in Reykjavík. The statue was unveiled on 24 February 1924, and hence the ashtray must be of later date. Made by British company Dunn Bennett.

  • ÁW 117 Kristalsglas / Stemmed glass

    Stemmed glass, cut-glass.

  • 2019-53-1 Matarstell / Tableware(2000-2019)

    Tableware 2000-2019 Plate, glass and bowl, IKEA, KALAS line. Tableware of this kind is common in Icelandic homes and has been since the turn of the 21st century.

  • 2019-53-2 Hnífapör / Cutlery(2000-2019)

    Cutlery, KALAS line, IKEA. Cutlery of this kind is common in Icelandic homes and has been since the turn of the 21st century.