From mire to metal
  • 30.4.2022 - 29.1.2023 The Corner - National Museum of Iceland

In the past, iron smelting from bog iron was performed in Iceland. The use of metallurgical furnaces called bloomeries were used to smelt iron throughout the Middle Ages. Thereafter the practice steadily declined until it was completely abandoned in the 17th or 18th century. The knowledge of this ancient craftmanship has since been forgotten to time, leaving numerous questions about the bloomery process unanswered.

Read more

In the eleventh hour
  • 17.9.2022 - 26.2.2023 The Photo Gallery - National Museum of Iceland

In the 1970s, only a few of Iceland’s turf houses were still inhabited. Having served as the primary form of housing for more than a thousand years, the Icelandic turf farm had now played out its role, and with no comprehensive preservation plan in sight, the remaining farms faced extinction.

Read more

Saga of Hofstaðir, Unearthing the Past in North Iceland
  • 22.02.2020 - 2.10.2022 The Arc Hall - National Museum of Iceland

At Hofstaðir in the district of Lake Mývatn, north Iceland, extensive archaeological excavations have been carried out over the past three decades. The site includes remains from the Viking Age to the 20th century. A huge Viking-Age structure was excavated: a hall or longhouse where people gathered on social occasions, with other smaller buildings around it. The hall is one of the largest structures ever excavated in Iceland. In addition, a churchyard was excavated at Hofstaðir, which is one of the oldest churchyards unearthed in Iceland. Whole families were laid to rest in the cemetery, and their bones yield evidence about their lives. The face of one of the women buried at Hofstaðir has been reconstructed using DNA technology, and a drawing of her is included in the exhibition.

Read more

A Rainbow Thread
  • The National Museum of Iceland

The Rainbow Guide is a queer guide to The National Museum of Iceland's permanent exhibition, Making of a Nation – Heritage and History in Iceland. It deals with queer history in Iceland. The term queer refers to sex, gender and sexuality that don't coincide with the traditions and customs of a particular time period, including people who would today be called trans, intersex, non-binary, or homo-, bi-, pan- or asexual. The Rainbow Guide is created by The National Museum of Iceland and Samtökin ‘78, The National Queer Organization of Iceland, to mark Samtökin's 40 year anniversary.

Read more

Welcome to the Family Room!
  • The National Museum of Iceland

The Family Room is for families, school groups, and other visitors to the Museum. It is an adaptable space that can be changed from a lounge to a classroom or a laboratory as required. 

Read more