Making of a Nation - Heritage and History in Iceland 1.9.2004 - 1.12.2100 National Museum of Iceland Suðurgata 41

The National Museum of Iceland's permanent exhibition, Making of a Nation - Heritage and History in Iceland, is intended to provide insight into the history of the Icelandic nation from the Settlement to the present day.

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A Rainbow Thread 15.11.2018 - 15.11.2022 National Museum of Iceland Suðurgata 41

The Rainbow Guide is a queer guide to The National Museum of Iceland's permanent exhibition, Making of a Nation – Heritage and History in Iceland. It deals with queer history in Iceland. The term queer refers to sex, gender and sexuality that don't coincide with the traditions and customs of a particular time period, including people who would today be called trans, intersex, non-binary, or homo-, bi-, pan- or asexual. The Rainbow Guide is created by The National Museum of Iceland and Samtökin ‘78, The National Queer Organization of Iceland, to mark Samtökin's 40 year anniversary.

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The Home of Ingibjörg and Jón Icelanders' Headquarters in Copenhagen 1852–1879 6.12.2018 - 6.12.2022 Jónshús

Jón was Iceland’s leader in its struggle for an independent union with the Danish king and an exemplar for the independence struggle of later eras. The home, often lively and crowded, was the site of Icelanders’ most important political meetings in Copenhagen.

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Welcome to the Family Room! 17.6.2019 - 18.6.2100 National Museum of Iceland Suðurgata 41

The Family Room is for families, school groups, and other visitors to the Museum. It is an adaptable space that can be changed from a lounge to a classroom or a laboratory as required. 

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From mire to metal 30.4.2022 - 29.1.2023 The Corner - National Museum of Iceland Suðurgata 41

In the past, iron smelting from bog iron was performed in Iceland. The use of metallurgical furnaces called bloomeries were used to smelt iron throughout the Middle Ages. Thereafter the practice steadily declined until it was completely abandoned in the 17th or 18th century. The knowledge of this ancient craftmanship has since been forgotten to time, leaving numerous questions about the bloomery process unanswered.

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