Who’s in the Picture?
  • The Photo Gallery - 2018

In the early days, photography was largely the preserve of professionals. One of the many portrait photographers in Reykjavík in the first half of the 20th century was Alfreð D. Jónsson, who ran a studio from 1931 to 1935 at Klapparstígur 37, and then at Laugavegur 23 from 1935 to 1952.

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Family Photos with a Difference
  • The Photo Gallery - 2018

Nanna Bisp Büchert has made a name for herself in Danish photography. Some of her work references Iceland, but none so powerfully as Family Photos with a Difference.

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EyeSound
  • The Photo Gallery - 2018

Photography: Iben West and Else Ploug Isaksen

Words: Sigurbjörg Þrastardóttir, Kristín Ómarsdóttir, Hallgrímur Helgason and Einar Már Guðmundsson 

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Splendid saddlery
  • The Arc Hall - 2018

Horsemen and -women took pride in high-quality and ornamental riding equipment. A beautifully-decorated saddle was a valuable possession. In past centuries women generally rode in a side-saddle with both legs on one side of the horse or "aside", while men rode "astride".

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Fishing Stations of Old Iceland
  • The Wall - 2018

Karl Jeppesen has photographed old fishing stations and camps around Iceland. On The Wall a selection of these photographs is exhibited. The abandoned fishing stations are in varying conditions. Some are clearly visible, but others have disappeared from the face of the earth. 

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The Long Apartment Block in Upper Breiðholt
  • The Photo Gallery - 2018

The building measures 320 metres, bearing a resemblance to a great wall. With its twenty staircases and 200 apartments, it is home to a few hundred people. David Barreiro has photographed the building, the interiors of the apartments, and its inhabitants who share the experience of moving to Iceland from across the world.

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Birds, Fjord and Iceland Photographs by Björn Björnsson
  • The Photo Gallery - 2017

Björn Björnsson (1889-1977) was a self-taught photographer who worked as such in Iceland's Eastfjords alongside his work as a retailer in Norðfjörður mainly, but also in Seyðisfjörður and Djúpivogur. In later years, Björn specialised in nature photography and travelled the country for this purpose. His photographs of birds were published in newspapers and magazines, such as British Birds. An exhibition of Björn Björnsson's photographs will be on view in the Photo Gallery of the National Museum of Iceland 3.6.-17.9.2017. 

Inga Lisa

Thoughts of Home - Inga Lísa Middleton
  • The Wall - 2017

The title of the exhibition Thoughts of home refers to the subject of the photographs and their dreamlike hue. The photographer Inga Lísa Middleton lives in the United Kingdom and exhibits at the Wall of the Photographic Gallery photographs from her home country Iceland. The photographs are printed using a method called Cyanotype, giving them their characteristic blue tint. 

Steinholt – a Story of the Origin of Names
  • The Photo Gallery - 2017

The exhibition Steinholt – a Story of the Origin of Names is about the memory of a place. Christopher Taylor has spent time in Þórshöfn, North-East Iceland, and travelled the area to capture the landscape and tell stories of memories connected with Steinholt. 

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Grímsey
  • The Wall - 2017

Thjodm_Hvadersvona_PR

A Woman's Place...
  • The Arc Hall - 2015 - 2016

The exhibition A Woman's Place... examines the working lives of Icelandic women from 1915 to 2015.

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Jar

Bundled-up in Blue
  • The Corner - 2015 - 2018

An exhibition based on new research on the bones and grave good found in a settlement-era grave.

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Síra Arnór Árnason

Kaldal's Portraits and Kaldal, Time and Space
  • The Photo Gallery - 2016 - 2017

This year marks 120 years since birth of photographer Jón Kaldal (1896-1981). On this occasion, two exhibitions on his works will open at the National Museum of Iceland. 

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Ísland í heiminum

Iceland in the World, the World in Iceland
  • The Arc Hall - 2016 - 2017

Iceland, in both past and present, has been characterised by transnationalism – just like other countries in the world. Iceland has thus been a part of the mobility of people and ideas through the centuries. It is important to highlight this in the present, when current discourse is often based on the idea that in the past different parts of the world existed in isolation from each other. Prejudices are nothing new in Icelandic society, as for centuries Icelanders' ideas have been influenced by global conceptions of race.

In November 2016 the exhibition Iceland in the world, the world in Iceland was opened in the Arc Hall of the National Museum. The exhibition is based on research by anthropologists Kristín Loftsdóttir and Unnur Dís Skaptadóttir and their students at the University of Iceland. The exhibition shows that Iceland, in both past and present, has been characterized by transnationalism – just like other countries in the world. Iceland has thus been the platform for people's mobility and ideas over centuries.